lady_windermere: Spike profile (Default)
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Right, be honest, what to you think the actors really think of fandom.

[Poll #1457942]

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 05:39 pm (UTC)
gillo: (Default)
From: [personal profile] gillo
I think it depends massively on the individual actor. Some revel in it, others find it embarrassing. Some clearly actively encourage it, while some see it as a useful source of extra income.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 05:46 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, it does depend on the actor!

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 05:42 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, I was thinking of James Marsters myself, so that influenced my replies, I think James sees it as useful, and can be amused by it, but stays away from the fandom online.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 05:49 pm (UTC)
gillo: (Default)
From: [personal profile] gillo
He's either an even better actor than I thought, or he really enjoys the interaction with his fans, though I recognise that he also works extremely hard at it. He is aware of the idolisation but stays well away from it for fear it would go to his head. And yes, it's an extra source of income for him - but, as I said, he works incredibly hard to give fans a good experience, so I don't begrudge him a penny.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 05:54 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, James is hardworking, and really seems to give his fans as much of his time as he can when they go to see him. He deserves everything, and should be appreciated for it

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 06:06 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] dandies4ever.livejournal.com
Most of the actors/actresses I like seem to be amused by fandom/slash. I was mostly thinking of J2 and Kris and Adam from American Idol.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 06:10 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, quite a few of them seem to think of it as a way to gain publicity and be keept in the public eye, so put up with a lot. The darlings!

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 06:11 pm (UTC)
ext_6732: (Default)
From: [identity profile] kitty-poker1.livejournal.com
I also think it depends on the actor. I suspect Misha is rather amused by fandom and slash featuring him or Castiel, and David Nykl (Zelenka in SGA) apparently feels much the same.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 06:16 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, I think it much depends on the actor you choose as a viewpoint. I thought of James Marsters, who I believe stays away from it online, but is quite amused at any questions he is given.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 08:14 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] xenodike.livejournal.com
I don't think they go online but also think they can be amused by it and some of them like James for example has found a way to use it to his advantage.

I think some of them are very well aware that fandom is what keeps them interesting.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 08:42 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
I think some of them are very well aware that fandom is what keeps them interesting.

Yes, I think a few of them have a love/hate relationship with it. Probably aware of it, but do not follow it.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 08:23 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] love-jackianto.livejournal.com
I think it really depends on the actor. Gareth David-Lloyd used to say that he would print off fanfic and leave it around the Torchwood set.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 08:43 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, Gareth did seem to embrace it, as does John as well. That is why I asked if you had an actor in mind.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 08:39 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] ladypeyton.livejournal.com
Honestly I don't think actor's attitudes can be generalized like this. Some may love it, some may hate it, some may be homophobic, some might not. I couldn't even hazard a generalized guess.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 08:45 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, that is why I asked if you had an actor in mind. I could only do it thinking about James Marsters and a rough idea of how he might feel about it.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 11:21 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] shadowc44.livejournal.com
I keep trying to shorten this, then keep thinking of more points. It really does depend on the actor. I've been in fandom since the mid-70's, in a lot of fandoms. I've been to a fair number of conventions, and heard about quite a few more, from friends in different fandoms. I couldn't think of just one actor, because I've seen or heard of this happening to so many actors.

These are all reactions some actors have undoubtedly had, but so much of it depends on the actor's personality, how many years they've been dealing with adoring fans, what they've been told to do by their management or the studio/network, how comfortable they are being surrounded by strangers who want something from them, etc.

Quite a bit of it depends on how much they know about fandom overall, and what they've been told about it by other actors or other people on the show.The reactions to fandom, and especially to slash, are all over the spectrum. Fandom is more public now than it was 30-35 years ago, because of the internet, so actors are probably a bit more likely to know what they're getting in for. I think there's less fear than there used to be that slash would negatively impact the actor's career, in that it might make casting people think the actor himself is gay. In the 70s and 80s, that was the perception of some actors, and it could still hold true today for some. At that time most fans were trying desperately to keep their stories and artwork away from the actor's attention.

A lot of it depends on the amount and type of fan interaction. If someone is frequently pestered by strangers when they're going about their daily life, it might give them a bad opinion, if that's mostly what they see. It's a different situation when they know they're going to be encountering fans, and are expecting questions or to be asked for autographs.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 12:08 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
I found the easiest way to answer was to stick to one actor and his reactions. I picked James Marsters, who, online, stays away from the fandom, but uses it to his advantage. Were I to think of someone like William Shantner, then he seems to be squicked by it, and want to run away.

Taking it over the ages then is has changed, as attitudes have changed and people in the business have learned how to handle the fan's attention, even so, a lot of the actors from the 60's do use it to their advantage, and seem amused by it all.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 02:54 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] shadowc44.livejournal.com
The way you phrased the answers as plural (actors, most actors), made it sound like you wanted opinions of more than one, and also it's really hard to get an overall view from just one actor. Of the actors I've seen at conventions, or met, they've all had really different reactions to fandom.

Fandom itself has changed tremendously since the Internet. For a while, only people who worked for certain companies had access to the Internet, so unless you worked for Hewlett-Packard, for instance, no Internet for you. Then it became available to the general public through AOL and a bunch of other companies, if you could afford to pay for the dial-up service. That's what brought a lot of fans in contact with each other, and made fandom more centralized.

The way we used to meet fans was at conventions, through letterzines, or sometimes writing to someone after reading their story in a fanzine, or maybe through a fan club. Now you can type in 'Supernatural' on Google and get who knows how many sites where you can find out more about it, meet fans, gossip, sometimes interact with writers or actors by asking questions. It used to be a lot harder to track down anything other than official merchandise or studio-released tie-in books.

So the way the actors interact with the fans has changed over the years, too. It's much easier for actors to get almost instantaneous feedback about their performance in an episode that just aired, rather than waiting to get a huge sack of fan mail, which they often didn't have time to read. Some try to get involved, and get shot down. David Duchovny tried to get involved in a fannish chatroom one time, and people were so rude to him! They refused to believe he was who he said he was, and treated him like a troll. He decided it was easier to sit back and let the fans have their fun and stay out of it. Same thing happened to Trent Reznor, with pretty much the same reaction. Trent's a lot more computer literate, though, and does interact with fans at the official Nine Inch Nails site, or at least he did a few years ago.

Some actors don't even read professional reviews of their work, let alone message boards or anything similar. That doesn't necessarily mean they don't appreciate the fans, but some don't want to be influenced by what some of the fans want to see. Others get a kick out of talking to the fans online, but it's really hard for the most cynical fans to accept that Mr. Actor is actually online with them or posting on a message board, responding to something they wrote.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 08:12 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, which was why I asked the last question about thinking of a certain actor. Some, like myself, might find it easier to answer from what is known about the actor.

James Marsters did join a messageboard at one point from a cafe, but after the initial, "Is it really you" got a good response. He found that, for his own sanity, it was best to keep away from fandom, but seems happy enough to interact with fans at conventions. So I took his stance as mine while answering the questions. I find his the most healthy.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-15 11:57 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] hils.livejournal.com
I think it depends on the actors personally. Some clearly get a kick out of it, others are indifferent and some hate it.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 12:10 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, I think it depends on the actor myself. I stuck to James Marsters in answering myself. He stays away from online fandom, but enjoys the benifits of it. A very healthy attitude.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 12:12 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] hils.livejournal.com
I think most actors enjoy the benefits whether they're part of the online fandom or not

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 12:23 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Maybe, but the ones who attract attention to have a higher profile in the online fandom. More people are interested in them.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 11:14 am (UTC)
ext_37213: (Default)
From: [identity profile] babycin.livejournal.com
Mmmhh.. I don't really know what to answer. I agree, that depends from the actor. I'm sure that "have" a fandom is something good for them, even if sometimes fans can be very annoying.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-09-16 11:41 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] http://users.livejournal.com/woman_of_/
Yes, I would say it is, to a certain extent, good for them to have people interested in them. Just balanced with how crazy some can be.

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